IFW Picks John Boland for Top Job

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After what he called a “nationwide search,” Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Commissioner Dan Martin picked longtime department staff member John Boland to fill the agency’s top professional position.

Boland has worked for DIF&W for 33 years, all of it in the Fisheries Division that he has led for the past eight years. His new job makes him the top non-political staff member and puts him in charge of both the Fisheries and the Wildlife Divisions.

Boland is personable and smart and an avid hunter, so wildlife issues will not be new to him, although he has big shoes to fill.

Dr. Ken Elowe left the position earlier this year to take an important position at the U.S. Fisheries and Wildlife Service. Elowe was well respected with a particularly good understanding of the political world in which DIF&W lives.

In his new position, Boland will manage 120 employees and a $14 million budget. Budget matters will quickly consume him.

Boland is certain to be frustrated with the small amount of time he’ll have available for the “fun stuff,” the projects and initiatives that benefit Maine’s fish and wildlife.

Mount Vernon’s Post Office Café

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Mount Vernon
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Mount Vernon’s Post Office Café: Spectacular soups, salads, sandwiches, and specials.

The Big City – Portland, Maine

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Portland
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George

The Poacher’s Son – A Great Book!

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Paul Doiron is lucky.

Yes, it took him four years to write his first novel, The Poacher’s Son. And he’s wearing himself out traveling the state promoting the book before small gatherings at libraries and other venues. And he still has to go to his regular job as editor of Downeast magazine.

But right out of the novelist’s starter’s gate, he snared a great agent, a 3-book contract with Minotaur, and an initial printing of 30,000 books.

Robyn Jackson, a newspaper features editor with 20 years experience who now writes about writing on her website, www.robynjackson.com, claims that 80 percent of Americans want to write a book.

“Anyone who has ever tried to find an agent or get a manuscript accepted by a publisher knows what a tough business writing is. Even if you do get your book published, there’s no guarantee anyone will buy it,” Jackson says.

She points to statistics about book publishing and reading on self-publishing guru Dan Poynter’s website, www.parapub.com.

An Entirely Synthetic Fish by Anders Halverson

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An Entirely Synthetic Fish
By Anders Halverson
Yale University Press 2010

This book could change your angling future. It should change the way you think about fish and fishing. It’s a “must read” for all Maine anglers.

Anders Halverson, in his book An Entirely Synthetic Fish, explains “how rainbow trout beguiled America and overran the world.”

Maine’s new flirtation with rainbow trout demands a better understanding of that fish and its impacts around the world. More importantly, it’s time for more Maine anglers to respect and protect our native fish.

Sure, that new painted-up hussy is attractive and tempting, but it’s never a good idea to abandon the one you brought to the dance. Appreciate what you’ve got, Maine anglers!

In state after state, rainbow romances drove anglers and fisheries managers to toss aside native species in favor of the painted hussy. It grew fast, jumped out of the water when hooked, and was easy to catch.

Maine Hatcheries – Time For Change

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A state Hatchery Commission, after meeting 15 times and spending $500,000 on engineering studies and plans, recommended in 2002 that Maine quadruple the pounds of fish grown in the hatcheries of the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and stocked throughout the state.

The Commission, on which I served, found that “there is increasing evidence that the State’s recreational salmonid fisheries no longer meet the expectations of many anglers. In addition, other New England states and Canada are heavily competing for the attention of these anglers and may be drawing anglers away from the State.”

“Maine’s fish production facilities form the backbone of the sport fishing industry in Maine and if Maine hopes to successfully compete on a national and international level for angler dollars, these facilities must be upgraded and maintained to produce significantly more salmonid fish,” said the Commission.

“Fish production goals must be implemented as expeditiously as possible to address angler’s perception that Maine’s recreational salmonid fisheries are in decline,” concluded the Commission.

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