George's Outdoor News

George’s new outdoor issues blog. He goes all over the state. He listens. And he reports on issues of concern to sportsmen, conservationists, and environmentalists.

IFW Picks John Boland for Top Job

Blog Showcase Image: 

After what he called a “nationwide search,” Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Commissioner Dan Martin picked longtime department staff member John Boland to fill the agency’s top professional position.

Boland has worked for DIF&W for 33 years, all of it in the Fisheries Division that he has led for the past eight years. His new job makes him the top non-political staff member and puts him in charge of both the Fisheries and the Wildlife Divisions.

Boland is personable and smart and an avid hunter, so wildlife issues will not be new to him, although he has big shoes to fill.

Dr. Ken Elowe left the position earlier this year to take an important position at the U.S. Fisheries and Wildlife Service. Elowe was well respected with a particularly good understanding of the political world in which DIF&W lives.

In his new position, Boland will manage 120 employees and a $14 million budget. Budget matters will quickly consume him.

Boland is certain to be frustrated with the small amount of time he’ll have available for the “fun stuff,” the projects and initiatives that benefit Maine’s fish and wildlife.

Maine Hatcheries – Time For Change

Blog Showcase Image: 

A state Hatchery Commission, after meeting 15 times and spending $500,000 on engineering studies and plans, recommended in 2002 that Maine quadruple the pounds of fish grown in the hatcheries of the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and stocked throughout the state.

The Commission, on which I served, found that “there is increasing evidence that the State’s recreational salmonid fisheries no longer meet the expectations of many anglers. In addition, other New England states and Canada are heavily competing for the attention of these anglers and may be drawing anglers away from the State.”

“Maine’s fish production facilities form the backbone of the sport fishing industry in Maine and if Maine hopes to successfully compete on a national and international level for angler dollars, these facilities must be upgraded and maintained to produce significantly more salmonid fish,” said the Commission.

“Fish production goals must be implemented as expeditiously as possible to address angler’s perception that Maine’s recreational salmonid fisheries are in decline,” concluded the Commission.

Site by Fieldstone Media